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What Is Fusible Fleece?

If you're reading this post, chances are you probably came across fusible fleece in a sewing pattern or supply shop and weren't familiar with this particular sewing notion. No problem—we've got all the answers right here. Learn about fusible fleece, its uses, and how to apply it in this handy guide to a quilter's and bag maker's favorite lofty interfacing. Looking for fusible fleece for a project? Check out WAWAK's wide selection of interfacings, including quality fusible fleece.

Fusible fleece interfacing under a colorful quilt top and sewing scissors.
Fusible Fleece is a type of fusible interfacing that adds softness and loft to quilts, bags, and more.

WHAT IS FUSIBLE FLEECE?

So, let's get right to it: what is fusible fleece? In short, it's a type of soft, padded interfacing that can be adhered directly to fabric with an iron. Like other interfacings, fusible fleece is applied to the wrong side of a fabric (or inside of an item) to add softness, body, and stability to a project. It features a heat-activated adhesive on one side that allows you to permanently adhere it to another fabric just by ironing—no sewing required. Known for its low loft and soft feel, this polyester stabilizer is a popular choice among sewers, quilters, and bag-makers for adding body and softness to a variety of projects. 


What Is Fusible Fleece Used For?

Let's look at some specific ways sewers use fusible fleece to get a better idea of its utility and applications—maybe you'll even find some project inspiration!


Bag Making

In bag making, fusible fleece is often used to add body, softness, and a bit of structure to bag projects. You'll frequently see it used to pad straps, handles, and bag linings, or add structure to small bags and pouches. It's especially popular for quilted bags, device cases, diaper bags, totes, and other bags with a soft body or lining designed to cushion the objects inside.


Quilting

If you're a quilter, you've probably already noticed that fusible fleece sounds similar to quilt batting—and you'd be right! Fusible fleece is very similar to a low-loft polyester batting but is a bit more smooth, structured, and, of course, fusible. It's an excellent option for filling out the inside of quilted items to add a bit more weight and body without too much additional bulk. Because it is a bit more structured than quilt batting, it might be a tad too stiff for most blankets, but it's an excellent option for the inside of quilted items like wall hangings, table runners, and quilted bags or garments. 


Home Décor & Crafts

Similarly, fusible fleece is an excellent option for adding soft structure to items for home décor and interior design. Pillows, placemats, coasters, cushions, holiday decorations, and other décor items often call for fusible fleece due to its slightly plush feel and low profile. For crafting, Pellon Fusible Fleece offers an additional bonus: it doesn't just work with fabric! This fusible fleece also adheres to materials like cardboard and wood for crafting projects of all kinds. 


How Do You Use Fusible Fleece?

One of the main advantages fusible fleece offers is its ease of use. If you've used other types of fusible interfacing, this process will be familiar, but you'll pick it up in no time even if you haven't.


First, identify which side of the fusible fleece is the adhesive side. It will be rougher and a bit bumpy; this side will face the wrong side of the fabric. Cut the fusible fleece to match the fabric piece or area you want to adhere it to. Lay the fusible fleece down with the adhesive side up, then lay the fabric on top of the fleece with the right side facing up. Iron the layers of material, pressing the iron in one place for about 10 seconds at a time, lifting it, and placing it back down in a slightly overlapping area. Repeat until the entire surface of the fusible fleece has been pressed. Once the fabric cools completely, the adhesive will solidify, and the fabric will be ready to use!

QUICK TIP: FOR EXTRA THICKNESS, USE TWO LAYERS OF FUSIBLE FLEECE. APPLY THE FIRST LAYER TO THE FABRIC, AND THE SECOND LAYER ON TOP OF THE FIRST ONCE IT HAS COOLED.






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